E3 2012: Nintendo Press Conference (Live Blog)

Nintendo

Just like I did for Microsoft and Sony, I figured I’d live-blog my reactions to the E3 2012 Nintendo Press Conference. Here we go.

 

Initial Thoughts

Full disclosure: I’m not really a fan of Nintendo. They were big when I was a kid, and the Super Nintendo is undoubtedly my favorite old-school game console but, as I’ve grown up, I don’t really feel that they have. Futhermore, for every generation since (and including), the Nintendo 64, their competitors have offered better, be it graphics, online, extra content, or even the gaming itself, with the rare exception here and there (mostly from games they made themselves). Lastly, where their competitors seem to create new entities with each console, Nintendo is quite content with just recycling the same exact game on their new platform. I’ve lost track of how many Mario Party games we’re up to, and the same happens with Mario Kart.
Anyway, these things usually culminate in my E3 reactions being “really? That’s it?” This year, Nintendo will be showing off their next console, the horribly-named Wii U. Hopefully, there’s something for me to get excited about. Let’s find out.

[liveblog]

Final Thoughts

I’ve got a lot of them.

So here’s the thing: I imagine that, if you’re a fan of the Wii, then you probably enjoyed Nintendo. However, I wrote some things down during the show that I wanted to mention when all was said and done. I’ll go through them now:

– Regarding that the Wii U will have Netflix, Hulu Plus, etc. These “apps” are already out on competitors, so it’s hardly a major draw. I suppose if you get the Wii U and don’t already have either of the other two, good job, but it’s almost like these should be standard now. At the very least, it shows that Nintendo is not shunning them like they did with the original Wii, where they just wanted it to be about the games exclusively. In fact, two the three pillars (social and entertainment) are aspects that both Microsoft and Sony have been working on and building for two console generations, so it’s nice that Nintendo will finally be catching up on that effort.

– Which brings me to my next thought: by the time Wii U is out, Microsoft and Sony will be working on and/or announcing their own next gen systems. These will then come out after the Wii U and — due to how tech works — will not only be more powerful than the Wii U, but also able to take successful aspects of Wii U into consideration to implement into their system as well. In that, Nintendo will be behind again should this likely scenario play out.

– In fact, Microsoft’s announcement of SmartGlass already undercuts the Wii’s biggest draw. The Wii U’s controllers are undoubtedly proprietary units you will need to buy. In fact, it was mentioned that “up to two” will work with the system. Conversely, Microsoft seemed to get the jump on Nintendo by announcing that Smartglass would work with myriad tablets and smartphones to basically do everything that the Wii U gamepad was shown doing here. Expanding to beyond gaming, it may even do more. I imagine that the future will see both of these individual platforms adopt the other’s strengths but, if you already have an Xbox 360, you don’t need a Wii U now for the experiences demonstrated. I would’ve loved to have seen Nintendo’s reaction to learning about SmartGlass!

– Speaking of the Wii U gamepad, so many games were shown where the Wiimote is perfectly acceptable and actually the primary controller instead of the gamepad, which was relegated to perform other functions. It make me wonder about the disparity between gameplay. How necessary will it be to have one, or will anyone really need/want one? I assume it will be bundled with each system, though. If it were handled as a separate purchase (which might make sense financially, as it’s basically a PS Vita or a small tablet), that would add to the overall price.

– The Miiverse concept seems like an expansion on the Mii Channel the current Wii already has and is ripe for abuse. Kotaku reported on it as “get ready to get explicit drawings on your screen when you turn it on.”

– I liked when Reggie used the phrase “original all over again,” as it seems to work for Nintendo (but not for me) with their constant rehashes.

– How many people are going to go online and watch it in addition to all the other E3 stuff? Big Nintendo fans, I suppose. But think about it: there are people that don’t follow anything about video games except at E3. They report on the press conferences. Things not shown there are really just therefore not as important. How many people that you know that play video games even watch the conferences? A smaller number than actually play. Now how many of them are also going to go online and watch additional multi-hour conferences, too? I mean, on one hand it’s great that they have that much content. But I think they might overestimate how much interest or even free time people have. Sure, the gaming sites like IGN will cover the extraneous stuff but, to those that might hear about the big stuff from sources like CNN (who covered SmartGlass), they might not even hear about the extra stuff not shown in the main press conference. Also, with not having a true online service like Microsoft and Sony, they don’t have a platform to stream this stuff. I mean, why not create an E3 channel on the Wii? At least it’d be right there on your console. Perhaps the tech didn’t exist for it, but it’s just another area where they’ve fallen behind their competitors.

– Lastly, I feel like the Wii U name and logo don’t look much different from its predecessor and it (and even its name) will confuse people. It’s basically the same logo with a tiny U (not even the same size as the rest of the font). I was hoping for a name change, but no such luck.

This was the last of the big three that I watched. I’d have to say that Sony “won” (had the best show), with me struggling to place Microsoft and Nintendo. On one hand, Microsoft’s announcements of new services and SmartGlass were great, but it’s hard to place a conference debuting a new console as the bottom of the three.


Just like I did for Microsoft and Sony, I figured I’d live-blog my reactions to the E3 2012 Nintendo Press Conference. Here we go.

 

Initial Thoughts

Full disclosure: I’m not really a fan of Nintendo. They were big when I was a kid, and the Super Nintendo is undoubtedly my favorite old-school game console but, as I’ve grown up, I don’t really feel that they have. Futhermore, for every generation since (and including), the Nintendo 64, their competitors have offered better, be it graphics, online, extra content, or even the gaming itself, with the rare exception here and there (mostly from games they made themselves). Lastly, where their competitors seem to create new entities with each console, Nintendo is quite content with just recycling the same exact game on their new platform. I’ve lost track of how many Mario Party games we’re up to, and the same happens with Mario Kart.
Anyway, these things usually culminate in my E3 reactions being “really? That’s it?” This year, Nintendo will be showing off their next console, the horribly-named Wii U. Hopefully, there’s something for me to get excited about. Let’s find out.

[liveblog]

Final Thoughts

I’ve got a lot of them.

So here’s the thing: I imagine that, if you’re a fan of the Wii, then you probably enjoyed Nintendo. However, I wrote some things down during the show that I wanted to mention when all was said and done. I’ll go through them now:

– Regarding that the Wii U will have Netflix, Hulu Plus, etc. These “apps” are already out on competitors, so it’s hardly a major draw. I suppose if you get the Wii U and don’t already have either of the other two, good job, but it’s almost like these should be standard now. At the very least, it shows that Nintendo is not shunning them like they did with the original Wii, where they just wanted it to be about the games exclusively. In fact, two the three pillars (social and entertainment) are aspects that both Microsoft and Sony have been working on and building for two console generations, so it’s nice that Nintendo will finally be catching up on that effort.

– Which brings me to my next thought: by the time Wii U is out, Microsoft and Sony will be working on and/or announcing their own next gen systems. These will then come out after the Wii U and — due to how tech works — will not only be more powerful than the Wii U, but also able to take successful aspects of Wii U into consideration to implement into their system as well. In that, Nintendo will be behind again should this likely scenario play out.

– In fact, Microsoft’s announcement of SmartGlass already undercuts the Wii’s biggest draw. The Wii U’s controllers are undoubtedly proprietary units you will need to buy. In fact, it was mentioned that “up to two” will work with the system. Conversely, Microsoft seemed to get the jump on Nintendo by announcing that Smartglass would work with myriad tablets and smartphones to basically do everything that the Wii U gamepad was shown doing here. Expanding to beyond gaming, it may even do more. I imagine that the future will see both of these individual platforms adopt the other’s strengths but, if you already have an Xbox 360, you don’t need a Wii U now for the experiences demonstrated. I would’ve loved to have seen Nintendo’s reaction to learning about SmartGlass!

– Speaking of the Wii U gamepad, so many games were shown where the Wiimote is perfectly acceptable and actually the primary controller instead of the gamepad, which was relegated to perform other functions. It make me wonder about the disparity between gameplay. How necessary will it be to have one, or will anyone really need/want one? I assume it will be bundled with each system, though. If it were handled as a separate purchase (which might make sense financially, as it’s basically a PS Vita or a small tablet), that would add to the overall price.

– The Miiverse concept seems like an expansion on the Mii Channel the current Wii already has and is ripe for abuse. Kotaku reported on it as “get ready to get explicit drawings on your screen when you turn it on.”

– I liked when Reggie used the phrase “original all over again,” as it seems to work for Nintendo (but not for me) with their constant rehashes.

– How many people are going to go online and watch it in addition to all the other E3 stuff? Big Nintendo fans, I suppose. But think about it: there are people that don’t follow anything about video games except at E3. They report on the press conferences. Things not shown there are really just therefore not as important. How many people that you know that play video games even watch the conferences? A smaller number than actually play. Now how many of them are also going to go online and watch additional multi-hour conferences, too? I mean, on one hand it’s great that they have that much content. But I think they might overestimate how much interest or even free time people have. Sure, the gaming sites like IGN will cover the extraneous stuff but, to those that might hear about the big stuff from sources like CNN (who covered SmartGlass), they might not even hear about the extra stuff not shown in the main press conference. Also, with not having a true online service like Microsoft and Sony, they don’t have a platform to stream this stuff. I mean, why not create an E3 channel on the Wii? At least it’d be right there on your console. Perhaps the tech didn’t exist for it, but it’s just another area where they’ve fallen behind their competitors.

– Lastly, I feel like the Wii U name and logo don’t look much different from its predecessor and it (and even its name) will confuse people. It’s basically the same logo with a tiny U (not even the same size as the rest of the font). I was hoping for a name change, but no such luck.

This was the last of the big three that I watched. I’d have to say that Sony “won” (had the best show), with me struggling to place Microsoft and Nintendo. On one hand, Microsoft’s announcements of new services and SmartGlass were great, but it’s hard to place a conference debuting a new console as the bottom of the three.


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Jason L. Hubsch

Jason L. Hubsch

I love music, video games, comic books, pro wrestling, politics, and God -- and not necessarily in that order! If you like any of these, chances are we'll get along.

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